Tag Archives: Ghana

soon comes the night

A story about nightmares and race and growing up with boys with different backgrounds. The writer tells these tales in his own discovery of his place and his environment.

Ekow Eshun was born in London (UK), raised for a few years in Accra (Ghana), due to his family roots, and then  London followed again.

Here you will find his story in the magazine GRANTA. 

leaving gotham city

She is a young writer, born in Mampong (Ghana). When her family moved to the United States, she moved along. She did her studies over there and her longing to become a writer was born. She published a book ‘Homegoing’ (2016) that was accepted very well.

Here you will find a short story written by Yaa, for the magazine GRANTA.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor yaa ghasi

Professor wins ACLS fellowship for work on modern Ghana

The Ghanaian historian Naaborko Sackeyfio-Lenoch has won a fellowship. She did her Ph.D. on African History and she published her The Politics of Chieftaincy: Authority and Property in Colonial Ghana, 1920-1950.

She has not stopped her research, as a true academic. Now she has the opportunity to continue her work with this Fellowship and we hope another publication is on the way.

You will find more information here.

Naaborko Sackeyfio-Lenoch

No. PDOA, Please

Did you see your parents. I cannot remember this action by my parents. It probably has to do with culture and with time. The Ghanaian author Ghanaian Victoria Naa Takia Nunoo start her short story with the observation about her non-kissing parents, at least in plain sight in front of her. 

Read all of it here.Afbeeldingsresultaat voor Victoria Naa Takia Nunoo

Teju Cole talks to Taiye Selasi

Two writers with roots in West Africa met to talk. They both stormed into the literary limelights when they published their debut novels. Here you will read their thoughts on Afropolitism, race, Africa, writing and some other subjects.

Teju Cole and Taiye Selasi

CHANGES, A LOVE STORY

In this novel the writer Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana, 1942) paints the story of a young professional woman who works in a government department. Her name is Esi and she is married to Oko, a teacher. Together they have one daughter Ogyaanowa. The best friend of Esi for many years is the nurse/midwife Opokuya, who is married to Kubi, they have several children. You could expect they all would live happily everafter, but that is not to be.

Esi feels hampered by her marriage and a divorce is what follows, Oko is shocked by it. She stays on her own, her daughter stays with the mother of Oko, who teaches in a different part of the country. Esi has met the charming director of an international travel-agency. This married man, Ali, falls in love with the young and active and bright civil servant Esi. They get married, Esi being his second wife in his polygamous marriage. But even this marriage has its strains.

This is in short the story of the novel. There is another story inside the novel and this story reads like a feminist pamphlet. The protagonists discuss the merits and the absence of merits, the advantages ande disadvantages of marriage between one woman and one man, the polygamous marriage in which one man has several wives, the independence of a woman, can a woman live on her own without a man? Who takes the responsibility of raising the chiuldren? What is  the importance of the extended family in founding a marriage? I missed thought the possibility of one woman having a marriage with several men. Due to the pamphletical tendencies in the book different African traditions (“in Africa”!) are put into one bag, opposite the bag with different western concepts. 

This book has been dedicated to Kinna, the one who reads.

Ama Ata Aidoo – Changes, a love story – 1991

African novelists aren’t travel guides

The Ghanaian author Nii Parkes did an interesting thing in his first novel ‘Tail of the Blue Bird’. He did not limit himself to the English language, but also used two Ghanaian (or maybe better West African) languages. It was part of the story, for in his story we meet people who use different languages. Now the book has been translated into French, by a translator who was born and bred in Benin and who is able to speak Gbe. 

So you have your fair mix of sounds and words and meanings.

Read here an interview with Nii Parkes. 

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